Culture and Values, Home Page, Responsible Business, Who We Are

Meet Talibah Coffield

My name is Talibah Coffield and I am the founder and chair of the Jaguar Land Rover Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) network.

Our vision for the network is to empower ethnic diversity within Jaguar Land Rover. Championing diversity we will strengthen innovation, win the war for talent, encourage a diverse senior management structure and enhance customer brand perception.

The automotive industry is going through one of the largest periods of transformation we have ever seen. Therefore it is vital Jaguar Land Rover has diversity of thought in its organisation to ensure that we continue to create revolutionary products, which will create experiences our customers love for life.

Jaguar Land Rover signing the Race at Work Charter is a significant milestone for many reasons.

We are the first car company to be featured on the list again highlighting how Jaguar Land Rover continue to be pioneers in the automotive industry.

It also shows our customers that diversity and inclusion is important to us as a brand.

But most of it all it is a commitment to our employees. It demonstrates that JLR know that racial equality in the work place is imperative. The Race at Work Charter consists of 5 principles and enables our organisation to make practical actions that will drive positive change.We are only at the start of the journey but initiatives like the BAME network and JLR signing the Race at Work Charter are all fundamental steps in guaranteeing the growth of success of Jaguar Land Rover.

Culture and Values, Home Page, Responsible Business, Who We Are

SOLIHULL VOLUNTEERS GROW FRESH FRUIT AND VEG TO HELP THE LOCAL COMMUNITY

The opening of the new allotment is the latest community project supported by the Lode Lane factory, which aims to provide fresh produce for people in need of food who live in the Solihull and Birmingham area.

The team is working alongside Gro-Organic, who create green spaces to provide social and economic opportunities for some of the most disadvantaged people in the region, to help make a real difference in the community.

A team of volunteers overhauled the plot last winter, by clearing overgrowth, installing a polytunnel and raised beds in preparation for its first full year harvest.

The allotment will grow a range of fruit and vegetables including runner beans and raspberries, with the produce accompanying advice and recipes in seasonal food boxes. These will be distributed through a number of food banks, including – the Real Junk Food Project, Free Food Friday and the Incredible Edible Network.

There is also a hand-built earth oven at the allotment, where beneficiaries can enjoy the produce as soon as it is picked.

Dave Owen, Solihull’s Operations Director, said he was saddened to read that more than 100,000 children in Birmingham live in food poverty, adding:

“When the opportunity came to expand our partnership with Gro-Organic and create a community allotment, I knew the whole team would want to support it.

“This project provides an ideal opportunity to support the education, health and wellbeing of our workforce, while providing enough fresh, seasonal produce for 400 meals in its first year.”

This new allotment will also bring a wealth of wellbeing and education opportunities with it. A new work experience programme call ‘Moat-ivation’, aimed at 16 to 24-year-olds, will help improve their employability prospects and allow participants to gain a qualification in horticulture and landscaping.

Apprentice, Autonomous, DFT, Early Careers, Electrical Engineering, Electrified, Engineering, People, Software, Who We Are

Meet Our Pioneering Apprentices – Day 3 of 5

Simon FitzGerald is a Fifth Year Degree Apprentice in Electrical Engineering. Originally from an IT background, Simon is now an experienced member of our electrical team, and is working towards a Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Warwick.

“For the past couple of years I have delivered the Interior Sensing Platform (ISP), ensuring high quality software delivery from suppliers, as well as making sure we have a robust plan to resolve technical issues. I planned the scope and delivery of upcoming software releases, analysing changes in requirements, resolving technical issues and tracking actions at a project level.”

“After leaving college I completed an IT apprenticeship and worked as an IT engineer for a few years. This served me well as it offered further learning opportunities and the prospect of real work with earning potential. Upon completing my IT apprenticeship, I soon felt I was lacking a challenge at work and began looking at future prospects including a new job role, university and higher apprenticeships.”

“The Jaguar Land Rover programme was absolutely the best option for me. I was excited to learn new skills that would be relevant to my career in engineering, whilst being challenged and rewarded for my efforts every day. Back then there wasn’t such a wide range of apprenticeships to choose from, so it’s been great to see the growth in popularity over the last five years.”

“What advice would I give to my younger self? ‘Go for it!’ In my experience, you will be rewarded for being pro-active in seeking out new opportunities and asking challenging questions both inside and outside the organisation. Initially I was more reluctant to speak up, particularly when dealing with suppliers. It was a daunting prospect to challenge engineers far more experienced than myself on what they were delivering. I was cautious about being seen as inexperienced, but the culture here really rewards that technical curiosity and drive. My professionalism and determination to improve our products has been met with incredible support and as a result I have achieved more than I ever thought possible.”

“What I love most about Jaguar Land Rover is the challenges that I face daily in this organisation. Every day is different, enabling me to develop and hone new skills in constructive and valuable ways.” 

Simon is on the Degree Apprentice programme. To find out more about the Advanced, Higher and Degree Apprentice programmes we currently offer at Jaguar Land Rover, check out our careers website.

Apprentice, Body Engineering, Early Careers, Engineering, Featured-Lower, People, Who We Are

A day in the life of a second year apprentice


Who are you, and what do you do?

My name is Yassmine, I am a second year degree apprentice with body engineering within the cockpit and climate team.

What does your typical day look like?

I am in the second year of my degree apprenticeship which means I spend one day a week at college and the rest at work. At college I am working on completing my foundation degree in engineering. This includes subjects such as mathematics, electronics, materials and CAE (computer aided engineering). My day to day work mainly consists of using a software called CATIA to do computer aided design. The project I am currently working on is redesigning a new speaker grille to be situated on the centre of the dashboard. This consists of scoping the project by comparing the component to existing JLR and competitor products, discussing design features with senior members of the cockpit and climate team, and also looking into materials, mechanics and manufacturing processes.

That sounds interesting, and working on future products…

Yeah, It’s very interesting. I find it really exciting that I am only in my second year and I am already working on components that could be used in future vehicles that haven’t been released yet.

What led you to an apprenticeship at Jaguar Land Rover?

I went to a standard sixth form where my goal was to complete my A-levels and go to university – as had been my plan for my whole secondary school life. However, after not achieving the grades I wanted, I moved to UTC Oxfordshire where I was introduced to the idea of an apprenticeship.

I still applied to university, but also found out about the degree apprenticeship scheme that Jaguar Land Rover offered. This  intrigued me as I’d have the opportunity to get six years of technical experience working in an engineering role, a competitive salary, a bachelor’s degree in applied engineering from the University of Warwick (which was my University of preference anyway) and a job in the automotive industry.

What did you study at UTC Oxfordshire?

I studied a level 3 BTEC in engineering in which I received a triple distinction star, and A-level mathematics where I received an A. The entry requirements for the degree apprenticeship were D*D*D* and at least a C in mathematics so I was overjoyed when I received the grades I did.

How does university fit into your work life?

I will be starting at the University of Warwick in September of this year where I will do a week at university, followed by 5 weeks at JLR. This will continue for the remaining four years of my apprenticeship. I am really looking forward to this as, although I know it will be challenging, I want to progress my engineering knowledge to a more professional level and use this to help me at work.

I will need to attend lectures and complete assignments and exams during this time whilst also working, so I know that this is going to be very difficult. However I do not expect anything to be easy on this scheme, after all being part of such a prestigious apprenticeship is going to come with some hurdles which I am prepared to face.

You recently spoke at the Duke of York awards, how did that come about?

Yes that’s right, whilst I was at UTC Oxfordshire I worked on obtaining a gold Duke of York award by documenting and proving the engineering knowledge and experience I had worked for over the past couple of years. I was then awarded with a gold Duke of York award in 2017 at St James’ Palace in London. As well as this, I was also given an outstanding achievement award for Women in Engineering alongside 3 other girls from my college in the same event which was a pleasant surprise for us.

In January of 2019, representatives from the Baker Dearing Trust reached out to UTC Oxfordshire to invite us back to the Duke of York Awards to speak as UTC alumni. I attended this on the 30th January where I spoke about how the UTC helped me get to where I am now, and why I chose the degree apprenticeship route with Jaguar Land Rover.

Are you enjoying your Apprenticeship?

I really do enjoy it, I find exceptionally interesting and I’m learning and developing different skills every day. Having spent a year and a half on the apprenticeship scheme I cannot possibly imagine having followed a different route. This is because after gaining independence and a respectful role in a business such as this one I could not imagine myself going back to full time education as this would feel like backtracking to me.

I am looking forward to the remainder of my apprenticeship where I will be able to start studying for my Bachelor’s degree in applied engineering from the University of Warwick, as well as going on placement within other engineering departments at Jaguar Land Rover.

What advice would you give to someone considering options after school?

To me, this opportunity was a no-brainer! On the one hand, I had the option of going to university and studying full time, getting a degree within 3-4 years, and ending up in a lot of debt. On the other hand was this apprenticeship scheme which would take 6 years where I would get experience working in an engineering role, a generous salary, a fully funded degree from a Russell Group university, and the beginnings of a career.

I would suggest making sure you look into every available pathway and the specific benefits they could have for you. For the vast majority of my education I was focused on going down the standard University route and it was only within the last six months or so of my education that I decided on doing an apprenticeship and I’m so glad that I did. A degree apprenticeship at Jaguar Land Rover was a great option for me.