Apprentice, Body Engineering, Early Careers, Engineering, Featured-Lower, People

From Young Women in the Know to Furthering Futures

What drew you to Jaguar Land Rover when you were seeking an apprenticeship?

I initially considered Jaguar Land Rover as it is a well-known, respected company and local to home. I discovered Jaguar Land Rover apprenticeships through the Young Women in the Know Programme (now Furthering Futures) where I spent a week visiting the Jaguar Land Rover sites, experiencing the facilities and meeting engineers. I was especially inspired by the apprentices I met who were only a couple of years older than me and working on some really exciting projects.  My impression of Jaguar Land Rover, was that it was an exciting, friendly and supportive place to work with a focus on developing people; somewhere I could see myself being happy. This course is the reason I am an apprentice at Jaguar Land Rover today!

Why did you decide to do a Degree Apprenticeship rather than go to university?

Although I was keen to do a degree, the traditional University route didn’t appeal to me. A degree apprenticeship offered the opportunity to work/earn money at the same time as studying meaning I could afford to move out and get a car. It also offered more practical experience and a direct route into employment, which was attractive because getting a job out of university is very competitive.

Describe a typical day at work

Typically I work 7:00am – 3:30pm. My day is split between a CAD role which involves developing designs in CAD, running CAE and analysing results and a Lead Engineer Role where I am responsible for delivering robust engineering releases and managing my parts through gateways. I tend to spend most of my time at my desk, but I am regularly on the phone, attend engineering reviews and meeting with my supplier.

As part of the apprenticeship, I attend University 6 weeks throughout the year and I spend a day a week working on my NVQ and work based projects.

What is the most challenging part of your job?

The most challenging part of my job is managing and prioritising my time between work, university, NVQ and other commitments. Although, I do enjoy being busy and I am never bored at work!

What advice would you give to your younger self?

Identify role models and speak to as many people as you can about careers and their experience. Challenge yourself to step out of your comfort zone because there are so many opportunities available!

What do you love most about working at Jaguar Land Rover?

I love that there is always something interesting to work on and another problem to solve. My team is supportive and fun to work with and I love that I can look back to 2014, when I start my apprenticeship, and see how much I have gained in confidence and capability.

Apprentice, Body Engineering, Early Careers, Engineering, Featured-Lower, People, Who We Are

A day in the life of a second year apprentice


Who are you, and what do you do?

My name is Yassmine, I am a second year degree apprentice with body engineering within the cockpit and climate team.

What does your typical day look like?

I am in the second year of my degree apprenticeship which means I spend one day a week at college and the rest at work. At college I am working on completing my foundation degree in engineering. This includes subjects such as mathematics, electronics, materials and CAE (computer aided engineering). My day to day work mainly consists of using a software called CATIA to do computer aided design. The project I am currently working on is redesigning a new speaker grille to be situated on the centre of the dashboard. This consists of scoping the project by comparing the component to existing JLR and competitor products, discussing design features with senior members of the cockpit and climate team, and also looking into materials, mechanics and manufacturing processes.

That sounds interesting, and working on future products…

Yeah, It’s very interesting. I find it really exciting that I am only in my second year and I am already working on components that could be used in future vehicles that haven’t been released yet.

What led you to an apprenticeship at Jaguar Land Rover?

I went to a standard sixth form where my goal was to complete my A-levels and go to university – as had been my plan for my whole secondary school life. However, after not achieving the grades I wanted, I moved to UTC Oxfordshire where I was introduced to the idea of an apprenticeship.

I still applied to university, but also found out about the degree apprenticeship scheme that Jaguar Land Rover offered. This  intrigued me as I’d have the opportunity to get six years of technical experience working in an engineering role, a competitive salary, a bachelor’s degree in applied engineering from the University of Warwick (which was my University of preference anyway) and a job in the automotive industry.

What did you study at UTC Oxfordshire?

I studied a level 3 BTEC in engineering in which I received a triple distinction star, and A-level mathematics where I received an A. The entry requirements for the degree apprenticeship were D*D*D* and at least a C in mathematics so I was overjoyed when I received the grades I did.

How does university fit into your work life?

I will be starting at the University of Warwick in September of this year where I will do a week at university, followed by 5 weeks at JLR. This will continue for the remaining four years of my apprenticeship. I am really looking forward to this as, although I know it will be challenging, I want to progress my engineering knowledge to a more professional level and use this to help me at work.

I will need to attend lectures and complete assignments and exams during this time whilst also working, so I know that this is going to be very difficult. However I do not expect anything to be easy on this scheme, after all being part of such a prestigious apprenticeship is going to come with some hurdles which I am prepared to face.

You recently spoke at the Duke of York awards, how did that come about?

Yes that’s right, whilst I was at UTC Oxfordshire I worked on obtaining a gold Duke of York award by documenting and proving the engineering knowledge and experience I had worked for over the past couple of years. I was then awarded with a gold Duke of York award in 2017 at St James’ Palace in London. As well as this, I was also given an outstanding achievement award for Women in Engineering alongside 3 other girls from my college in the same event which was a pleasant surprise for us.

In January of 2019, representatives from the Baker Dearing Trust reached out to UTC Oxfordshire to invite us back to the Duke of York Awards to speak as UTC alumni. I attended this on the 30th January where I spoke about how the UTC helped me get to where I am now, and why I chose the degree apprenticeship route with Jaguar Land Rover.

Are you enjoying your Apprenticeship?

I really do enjoy it, I find exceptionally interesting and I’m learning and developing different skills every day. Having spent a year and a half on the apprenticeship scheme I cannot possibly imagine having followed a different route. This is because after gaining independence and a respectful role in a business such as this one I could not imagine myself going back to full time education as this would feel like backtracking to me.

I am looking forward to the remainder of my apprenticeship where I will be able to start studying for my Bachelor’s degree in applied engineering from the University of Warwick, as well as going on placement within other engineering departments at Jaguar Land Rover.

What advice would you give to someone considering options after school?

To me, this opportunity was a no-brainer! On the one hand, I had the option of going to university and studying full time, getting a degree within 3-4 years, and ending up in a lot of debt. On the other hand was this apprenticeship scheme which would take 6 years where I would get experience working in an engineering role, a generous salary, a fully funded degree from a Russell Group university, and the beginnings of a career.

I would suggest making sure you look into every available pathway and the specific benefits they could have for you. For the vast majority of my education I was focused on going down the standard University route and it was only within the last six months or so of my education that I decided on doing an apprenticeship and I’m so glad that I did. A degree apprenticeship at Jaguar Land Rover was a great option for me.


Apprentice, Body Engineering, Early Careers, Engineering, Featured-Lower, Learning and Development, People, Who We Are

Life of a Jaguar Land Rover Apprentice, What You Need to Know.

You’re probably thinking of going to university. Or maybe you’re about to leave the family nest, in search of education and an adventure. I certainly know that feeling. I’m sure you’re thinking about how to put your best foot forward as you step out into the big bad world, how to get the best out of your chosen career and how to best reach your potential.

Let me introduce myself, and I’ll share how I’m trying to do just that myself. My name is Callum, aged 20, I joined David Game College in 2017, I studied A-level maths and as I grew into the year, I found the concept of taking out enormous loans to further my education less and less enticing. In addition, through the variety of voluntary projects I’ve been involved in, I discovered how satisfying it is to work with your hands; building, making, creating and decided I wanted to continue learning in this way.

I began investigating apprenticeships in early October 2017.

An apprenticeship, in case you don’t know, is a course of study you can take under the employment of a business or institution, where you work and study for recognised qualifications. You’ll receive on-the-job training for your chosen career path, and get paid for your time. In addition to gaining an income and the associated responsibilities of this (paying for your board and lodgings for one) I found there were many, many benefits to studying this way, a debt-free degree being foremost among them. For example, on the scheme I’ve been accepted on (Vehicle Engineering with Jaguar Land Rover) I’ll receive a BEng in Applied Engineering from the University of Warwick (one of the Russell group Universities, which has a fantastic engineering and maths department) saving me up to £80,000 over 4 years. Best of all, an Apprenticeship gives you the opportunity to learn, grow, mature and take responsibility in a working environment in a way that going to university the “normal way” just does not.

I started my apprenticeship on the 3rd of September, commencing with an induction week at the Ricoh Arena, Coventry. Here I received excellent motivational speeches, inspirational lessons on the separate design languages of Jaguar and Land Rover, and had lots of opportunities to network and make friends with my newfound workmates. I received my uniform, which I am to wear to college and work, and met my line manager, who will be responsible for my development and training for the next 6 years.

We also had two very special presentations, one by James Barclay (the Team Director of Jaguar Panasonic Racing Team) and another by the Chief Program Engineer of the brand new Jaguar I-PACE, Jaguars first All-Electric Performance SUV. I then spent the week beginning the 10th of September at Warwickshire Trident College, completing assessments, learning about the company ethos and endeavouring to create an open and inclusive learning environment.

I started my studies in September, and have so far done 3 week blocks of study in Hand Fitting and Electronics. In hand fitting I learned metalwork (the very basics of modern engineering) and in electronics I learned basic soldering techniques and how to build working electronic circuits and logic gates. The work I’m completing right now is of a difficulty between GCSE and A-Level. Next week I’ll be starting an academic block, with Material Sciences, Maths, Physics, Automotive Engineering & Electrical Engineering all on the menu.

As I write this, I’m having a week’s work experience at Gaydon (where I’ll be based as of next year) working with the ‘home department’ I’ve been assigned to. I’ve linked up with my manager and the rest of the team, I’m working with current apprentices and graduates. I get the opportunity to experience what I’ll be doing during and after my apprenticeship, learning from experienced professionals, many of whom were apprentices and so understand what it’s like starting out at a large company. I know that they’re all around to help me if I need it, as we’re all part of a team, each individual is important at Jaguar Land Rover. Using our skills and talents, to create fantastic products for our customers.

Callum,
Jaguar Land Rover Degree Apprentice.


Considering an apprenticeship?

We want to transform the automotive landscape and shape the future of mobility – so our early careers training programmes are the route to an inspired career. Each is designed to give you the ideal mix of on-the-job training and focused, classroom-based learning.

Find out more

Apprentice, Early Careers, Engineering, Featured-Lower, People, Who We Are

Meet Our Pioneering Apprentices – Day 1 of 5

At Jaguar Land Rover we think it’s so important to have a diverse mix of views, perspectives and experiences. Our apprentices are in a truly unique position, where they gain theoretical knowledge which they can practically apply to make our cars even better every day. Early on in my career I was lucky enough to experience these benefits first-hand.

When I started as a kid in the 1980s I wanted to do electronics, and after my O-Levels at school I secured a place on an electronics apprenticeship, at what was then British Leyland in Oxford. As a 16-year-old it was a dream job, but it wasn’t to be. I discovered I was colour blind, and when you’re working with wiring you need to be able to tell the difference between red and green, so I couldn’t have the job.

Despite being deeply disappointed, I was then offered a role as a body engineer. This new role gave me all sorts of opportunities, for example crash testing and optimising the body structure of the vehicle. I can honestly say it was the best thing I ever did. I always say to people ‘don’t try to plan your career, just do the best you can and take every opportunity to learn’. I am truly grateful for all the experiences I had as an apprentice; they gave me a really solid grounding in a wide range of engineering disciplines and I learned so much about the business.

Today our apprentices are a crucial part of our engineering organisation. Their roles range from mechatronics maintenance and running test rigs, to software engineering, design and development. We have an industry-leading completion rate with 90 per cent of all apprentices completing their programme, compared to a national average of 67 per cent.

As skills shortages continue to grow as an industry wide issue, I firmly believe we should be encouraging more bright young people to consider an apprenticeship as a route into engineering.

Don’t just take my word for it. Starting tomorrow, and every day for the rest of the week, I will be sharing an article about one of our pioneering apprentices in Product Engineering, inviting them to share their experiences about their apprenticeship journey so far. Hopefully you find their insights as inspiring as I did!   

To find out more about the apprenticeship programmes we currently offer at Jaguar Land Rover, check out our careers website.

Autonomous, DFT, Electrical Engineering, Engineering, Featured-Lower, Home Page, People, Research, Software, Technology

THE REAL FACES OF JLR – Oriol Quintana Morales

What do you do at Jaguar Land Rover?

I work in the V2X department which basically means Vehicle-to-everything, and covers all kind of communication to other cars, infrastructure, cloud, pedestrians, etc. V2X will be an enabler for improving road safety, traffic efficiency and comfort.

For the last three years I have been working in the V2X Research department and mainly working on the V2X area of the government funded project called UK Autodrive. I have recently moved to the Pre-Development team to work on getting this technology in our cars.

What is the most enjoyable part of your job?

The most enjoyable and satisfactory part is when you see the V2X prototype systems that we have been working on for months working fine during the demonstration days to VIPs or to the press.

What is the most challenging part of your job?

The most challenging part of this job is that this technology keeps evolving because of the different working groups and consortiums in the world working on it. And as a company we have to make sure that our cars can communicate with the rest of world. In another words, we need to assure that Jaguar Land Rover cars speak the same language as the other cars.

Can you tell us about the research you’re currently working on?

In the UK Autodrive project that I previously mention, we have implemented a total of 7 V2X features, one of them is called GLOSA (Green Light Optimal Speed Advisory). This feature consists on the vehicle talking to the traffic light. Because of that the car will know when the traffic light will change to green or red. With that information the car will recommend the driver the speed that needs to drive for getting a green light pass.

What first stirred your interest in this area?

To be fair, when I joined the V2X department a few years ago I did not know much about V2X, but once you start understanding the basic principles is when you realise the big potential and the big impact that will create to the automotive industry. It was at that moment when my passion to V2X started.

What skills and tools do you use on a daily basis?

I basically use different programing tools for creating the initial V2X prototypes. The good thing of the early prototypes in research is that we have to do everything. From wiring the V2X antennas to the roof of the car to designing, programing and testing the applications with cars in test tracks or public roads.

What applications do you foresee for this research?

I can see most of the applications that we have researched and trialled on the marked in the near future, because most of them are also being tested in other regions of the world by different car manufacturers. All will be determined by the penetration in the market of that technology, because some features needs a high percentage of cars equipped with that technology.

If there is such a thing, can you describe a typical day for you?

A typical day can be quite varied, because of the multidisciplinary tasks that we perform. Some days we focus on programing and simulating our algorithms and some others we spend the whole day driving around testing our system.

How did you get interested in engineering?

I think that my interest to engineering started when I was a kid. I remember playing infinite hours with Lego type of games, where as a kid you start training some engineering skills. After that I started to be interested in electronics and robotics and I guess that this passion for new technology brought me to where I am today.

What do you love most about working at Jaguar Land Rover?

If I have to choose one thing I would say the people that I have been lucky to work with. Working at Jaguar Land Rover gives you the opportunity to meet people from all over the world and I find this fascinating because everyone always has a different point of view. Being able to work with this cross cultural environment is something that really enriches me as a person.

What piece of advice would you give someone who is considering a job at Jaguar Land Rover?

I would say that in Jaguar Land Rover there are plenty of different jobs and roles, so the best thing is to choose to work on something that you like or you have passion for.