Electrified, Home Page, Powertrain

We take engineering to the next level.

‘I started my career with JLR 9 years ago, after graduating from Imperial College, London, with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. My home department at the time was Diesel Calibration (essentially “tuning” diesel engines). After completing my graduate scheme in the Diesel Calibration department and learning quite a lot about engines, I’ve then moved to the Transmission Calibration department, where I have spent further 3.5 years tuning transmissions coupled with V8 petrol engines.

This was an excellent opportunity for me to directly influence what the customers will feel from their everyday drives in some fantastic vehicles (including Jaguar XE SV Project 8, the Record Holder for Fastest Four Door Production Sedan around Nürburgring, Range Rover Sport SVR and so on). These Calibration roles have given me the opportunities to go around the world, testing and calibrating our vehicles in extreme conditions, such as Death Valley in America and Sand Bowls in Dubai. These opportunities were great fun, and they have given me valuable lessons into the importance of engineering that goes into the early phases of the development cycle.’

Following on from my journey with ICE vehicles, I have then started to become interested in EV technologies. I believe, to achieve sustainability for future generations, we must develop and innovate technologies that will rapidly increase EV adoption, especially amongst the younger generation.

With this motivation, I have been fortunate to be working in the System Engineering division of Electrified Powertrain department for the last four years. I work to ensure our customers are not only satisfied but excited to be driving the portfolio of vehicles we develop. To achieve this, I work with my colleagues who are close to our customers and understand exactly how we can deliver a fantastic product to our customers. I then translate what this means in engineering terms (such as the required power from the electrified powertrain as a unit) and work very closely with our component experts to make sure we have a great combination of components to deliver a product that allows our vehicles to put a smile on our customers’ face every time they get in their vehicles.

Knowing this truly excites me and motivates me every day.

As engineers, we are challenging the norms for the efficiency and the performance of our electrified powertrains every day for a better, sustainable future!’

Diversity & Inclusion, Early Careers, Engineering, Home Page, Powertrain, Undergraduate

Everyone around you wants the best for you and are willing to help you out.


“Even though Jaguar Land Rover is a large company I’ve been given lots of responsibilities straight away and really feel I’m part of the team. Everyone around you wants the best for you and are willing to help you out and include you in all the new and exciting projects. My manager and the Early Careers team have tailored projects and my placement based of what I would like from my experience here.


Currently I’m work on a project in EDS on harnesses, alongside three of my own projects that I’ll complete throughout my yearlong placement. I will present these projects at the end of my placement with my learnings.


There are fewer women in engineering, especially in Powertrain, than men but this is changing with the new intakes in early careers. It’s an exciting time to be a part of the business.”


Applications for our Undergraduate Programmes are now open. Find out how you can help define the future of movement here: http://ow.ly/rR5850GmK72


#LifeatJLR #Undergraduates #NGW21

Electrical Engineering, Engineering, Home Page, Powertrain

What’s really important to me is bringing in new ways of thinking.

‘A big part of working on electric cars involves rapid tech changes. Being involved in such a new technology means we are constantly innovating to deliver the best products, while working in a fast paced and agile environment.   

Coming straight from Uni and having worked in powertrain electrification for the past three years I can tell you it’s an incredibly exciting industry to be involved in. Every year the public awareness of electrification increases, and this brings a real buzz to everything we are doing.  It is also great to see how the technology which we are developing and innovating is having a positive impact on society.

What’s really important to me is bringing in new ways of thinking – it’s something our whole team is passionate about. We are back on site now 2-3 times a week – and it’s great to be able to get together to talk through projects. It’s sometimes those small interactions during the day that bring great ideas to life. We all understand the impact we have on the design of vehicles and our ideas are always encouraged.

Jaguar Land Rover is a hugely exciting place to be at the moment. There is a vast amount of work happening in electrification and we are constantly striving to deliver the most competitive systems in this arena.’

Come and get involved and #ReimagineYourFuture: http://ow.ly/u9Cj50GcPg0

#LifeatJLR #Engineering

Electrified, Home Page, Powertrain

I’m really lucky to be working in an area where we’re pushing the boundaries of what’s possible

“I started with Jaguar Land Rover as a Diesel emissions engineer over six years ago, three years ago I was given the opportunity to work at a new test facility that we’d built to help with all of the emissions testing we needed to do. What I didn’t appreciate at the time was just how incredibly capable and world-class that facility is.

JLR has the largest number of powertrain test beds of any company in the world. For the last three years I’ve been working together with the team who operate these beds. My role is to work out how we can push the capabilities of these test facilities to replace the work we currently do on the road and do it faster, more accurately and with a higher level of quality and capturing more data.

I’m engaging with teams across powertrain and beyond to understand what testing we can do and if we run a car or a powertrain once, how many people can use that data for their own work?

I’ve also been pushing this further by taking these cases from the road into the fully virtual space. I work with our CAE teams to allow our development teams to work on technologies and understand how they perform before we’ve got something physical to test. By the time physical hardware turns up we know how it works and how best to extract the most performance from it.

I feel like I’m really lucky to be working in an area where we’re pushing the boundaries of what’s possible. I never have two days the same and I’m always thinking “what’s next?”, that to me is what we’re all about, we can’t stand still.

We’re in the midst of a massive change in the automotive industry and with Jaguar Land Rover, I’m getting a great opportunity to influence how we react to that.”

Come and get involved and #ReimagineYourFuture: http://ow.ly/u9Cj50GcPg0

#LifeatJLR #Engineering

Electrical Engineering, Hungary, India, Powertrain, Shannon, Software, Technology

The inaugural Jaguar Land Rover GDD Hackathon

True to its name, it was indeed a global event with teams joining across all the GDD hubs in Gaydon, Manchester, Portland, Shannon, Hungary and India. The first stage of the competition kicked off with sourcing problem statements from all Jaguar Land Rover colleagues in May, and finally six problem statements were announced in June across the three domains – Electrical engineering, Power Electronics and Mechatronics.

Putting ourselves forward for the challenge

My teammates, Abhijith N Balan and Ronit Hire Jaisingh, and I are Software Engineers at Jaguar Land Rover India. We heard about the hackathon through word of mouth and decided to register for it. It would be our first hackathon since graduating from college two years ago and we were excited to get this chance to showcase our skills. With about a week to go for the registration deadline, we started having meetings to go through each problem statement in detail and choose the one that aligns with our vision the most. We found the HMI Navigation Testing problem statement intriguing and implementable in the near future in our cars. This was ideal since our prime goal was to help improve the customer experience we offer by solving real world technical problems. We also reckoned that it might have the most teams competing (which turned out to be correct), which was perfect since we were up for a challenge.

One of our last meetings leading up to the hackathon was to decide our team’s name for registration, which ran for over an hour (not our proudest moment) before we ended up finalizing “Chaotic Coyotes” (combined with our GitLab GraphRunner, a nod to the beloved childhood cartoon, the Road Runner). At the end of the meeting, we joked that this might be the longest meeting we have for the entire duration of the hackathon. If only we knew how wrong we were going to be!

The hackathon kicked off on 1st July at 12 noon BST

We realized that the deadline for the competition was the next day midnight for the UK, which was 4:30 am on a Saturday for us, far from ideal. At the start we felt our chances to complete in time looked bleak due to this fact. Nevertheless, we decided upon one thing – whenever one of us is working, he will join the teams meeting so that the others know about it. This probably turned out to be a game changer for us as over the next 36 hours we ended up with more than 25 hours of meetings! For our problem statement, we had to develop an algorithm that was capable of automating the HMI Validation of the car infotainment screen.

Given the home screen our algorithm had to ensure that we clicked on all buttons and visited all the available screens so that they can be tested, with two key factors deciding the quality of the solution – the efficiency and randomness. The algorithm needed to be efficient enough to not keep on repeatedly testing the same screens or buttons, and yet random enough to mimic the typical user’s behaviour where they might choose to visit certain screens more often than others. Balancing this trade-off would be crucial to developing an acceptable solution. I have my teammates to thank for coming up with ingenious approaches and a few clever workarounds which we stitched together and incorporated into one satisfactory solution.

The 36 hours of the hackathon for us were replete with all the clichés of a typical coding hackathon during our college days – sacrificing all sleep, forgetting meals sometimes, discovering a blunder less than an hour from the deadline and scrambling to correct it! Finally, at exactly 4:30 am on Saturday we submitted our solution and heaved a sigh of relief.

The presentation

After catching up on all the lost sleep over the weekend, we prepared for the next stage of the competition – the presentation. The judges had a lot of questions for us which we answered confidently and a few valuable inputs too which could add to our algorithm. We felt good about our chances after the presentation, but were mindful of the other teams too who undoubtedly would have brilliant solutions of their own. Before the results were declared we even got the chance to view the work done by all the other teams, and we found some strong contenders among those with quite efficient approaches.

Winning!

We were delighted to learn that our team was announced the winner, and excited when we were told about what lied ahead. Our implementation had impressed the judges and post the hackathon we have been working on bettering it and pitching to the senior management. We received quite positive feedback for our solution from the Chief Engineer (Software Validation & Integration) at Jaguar Land Rover and his team.

Recently, we also pitched our solution to the Elec & Systems Engineering Director who reviewed all the winning entries from the hackathon. In the next few weeks, we will be working on integrating our algorithm with the current testing strategy by the validation team for a PoC. All in all, it was an exhilarating experience for us. It was a commendable effort by the organizing committee to set this up from scratch and we hope to see our project come to fruition in our cars soon!

Siddharth Brahmbhatt, Software Engineer – ADAS